Guardian discussion of tutoring

Pupils sit GCSE maths examI have recently come across a number of articles about tutoring in The Guardian newspaper. There has been a debate about the rising number of parents choosing private tutors to support their children at school.

Here is an extract from the article, published last year.

“The world of education – or at least, the world of parenting – has gone tutor mad. A headteacher friend told me how she recently received a note from a parent explaining that her son couldn’t be in school on Wednesday afternoon “because it’s the only time his French tutor can see him next week”. Most worrying of all, despite the head’s spluttered remonstration, the parent didn’t seem to get the point that school comes first.”

Mmm, interesting. I certainly don’t agree with that! But I read on…

“Tutors, it seems, are where it’s at – a fact borne out by Tuesday’s story that there are now twice as many tutors as school teachers in England, and parents are falling over themselves to supplement the learning their kids are doing in school, by reinforcing it in the evenings or at weekends (or even, in the case of the child in my friend’s story, in the middle of the school day).”

Now that is more like it. Tutors reinforce what the children do in the day. The article continues…

“Tutors come into their own when children are approaching exams. There are areas of Britain, especially those with selective education, where a tutor is de rigueur if your child has any chance of passing. It’s not just the skills involved, it’s the technique, the knack: and that’s what they deliver. I know of tutors with lengthy waiting lists.”

There is also reference to a worldwide increase in the use of tutors…

“Apparently the clamour for tutoring is global: and again, given the preponderance of ambitious middle-class parents across the world, that doesn’t surprise me. Nothing is as contagious as parental anxiety: where one mother or father is worrying about his or her child, you can bet there will be others doing just the same. If a child in your offspring’s class gets a tutor, suddenly everyone is at it. Nothing eats away at any of us like the possibility that our child isn’t getting every possible opportunity – and that’s not cultural, it’s human instinct. If a tutor can advantage my child, and I can afford it, I am willing to pay for it.”

What do you think about this? I would be interested in your comments. Please use the contact form on the front page.

Advertisements

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s